Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (quotes)

August 21, 2008


I just began reading my new favorite book.  I haven’t even completed it yet; I am only on page 86, but I am always able to tell by about page 20 if a book will be my favorite or not.  Don’t ask me how because I am not sure how either.  These are just some quotes that made me feel something while I was reading this beautifully written story.

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“Being with him made my brain quiet.  I didn’t have to invent a thing.” [12]

“Well, what I don’t get is why do we exist?  I don’t mean how, but why.”  I watched the fireflies of his thoughts orbit his head.  He said, “We exist because we exist.”  “What the?” “We could imagine all sorts of universes unlike this one, but this is the one that happened.” [13]

“Just because you’re an atheist, that doesn’t mean you wouldn’t love for things to have reasons for why they are.” [13]

“The meaning of my thoughts started to float away from me, like leaves that fall from a tree into a river,  I was the tree, the world was the river.” [16]

“We laughed and laughed, together and separately, out loud and silently, we were determined to ignore whatever needed to be ignored, to build a new world from nothing if nothing in our world could be salvaged, it was one of the best days of my life, a day during which I lived my life and didn’t think about my life at all.” [28]

“If I’d been somone else in a different world I’d’ve done something different, but I was myself and the world was the world, so I was silent.” [30]

“The end of suffering does not justify the suffering, and so there is no end to suffering, what a mess I am, I thought, what a fool, how foolish and narrow, how worthless, how pinched and pathetic, how helpless.” [33]

“It’s just that everything was incredibly far away from me.” [36]

“Our laughter kept the feathers in the air.   I thought about birds.    Could they fly if there wasn’t someone, somewhere, laughing?” [78]

“I have no need for the past, I thought, like a child.  I did not consider that the past might have a need for me.”  [78]

“I did not need to know if he could love me.  I needed to know if he could need me.” [84]

“When Dad was tucking me in that night and we were talking about the book, I asked if he could think of a solution to that problem.  “Which problem?”  “The problem of how relatively insignificant we are.”  He said,  “Well, what would happen if a plane dropped you in the middle of the Sahara Desert and you picked up a single grain of sand with tweezers and moved it one millimeter?”  I said, “I’d probable die of dehydration.”  He said, “I just mean right then, when you moved that single grain of sand.  What would that mean?”  I said, “I dunno, what?”  He said, “think about it.”  I thought about it.  “I guess I would have moved a grain of sand.”  “Which would mean?”  “Which would mean I moved a grain of sand?”  “Which would mean you changed the Sahara.”  “So?” “So? So the Sahara is a vast desert.  And it has existed for million of years.  And you changed it!”  “That’s true!”  I said, sitting up.  “I changed the Sahara!”  “Which means?”  he said.  “What?  Tell me.”  “Well, I’m not talking about moving that one grain of sand one millimeter.”  “Yeah?”  “If you hadn’t done it, human history would have been one way…” “Uh-huh?”  “but you did do it, so…?”  I stood on the bed, pointed my fingers at the fake stars, and screamed:  “I changed the course of human history!”  “That’s right.”  “I changed the universe!”  “You did.”  “I’m God!’  “You’re an atheist.”  “I don’t exist!”  I fell back onto the bed, into his arms, and we cracked up together. [86]

“I shook my tambourine the whole time, because it helped me remember that even though I was going through different neighborhoods, I was still me.” [88]

“Humans are the only animal that blushes, laughs, has religion, wages war, and kisses with lips.  So in a way, the more you kiss with lips, the more human you are.” [99]

“Songs are as sad as the listener.” [108]

“I like to see people reunited, maybe that’s a silly thing, but what can I say, I like to see people run into each other, I like the kissing and the crying, I like the impatience, the stories that the mouth can’t tell fast enough, the ears that aren’t big enough, the eyes that can’t take in all of the change, I like the hugging, the bringing together, the end of missing someone…” [109]

“Everything was forever fixed, there would only be peace and happiness, it wasn’t until last night, our last night together, that the inevitable question finally arose, I told her, “Something,” by covering her face with my hands and  then lifting them like a marriage veil. “We must be.” [111]

“..Literature was the only religion her father practiced, when a book fell on the floor he kissed it, when he was done with a book he tried to give it away to someone who would love it..” [114]

“I hated myself for going, why couldn’t I be the kind of person who stays? [114]

“I thought that maybe if she could express herself rather than suffer herself, if she had a way to relieve the burden, she lived for nothing more than living, with nothing to get inspired by, to care for, to call her own…” [119]

“I worried about her, putting all of her life into her story, no, I was so happy for her, I remembered the feeling she was feeling, the exhileration of building the world anew.” [119-120]

“I should have drowned us there in the room, ended our suffering, they would have found us floating face-down in two thousand white pages, or buried under the salt of my evaporated tears…” [124]

“I’m trying,” Mr. Goldberg said to me, as if only the two of us existed.  “Trying what?” I asked, in a voice more concerned than I’d wanted, he took off his glasses again, “Trying to be.” [126]

“We go on killing each other to no purpose!  It is war waged by humanity against humanity, and it will only end when there’s no one left to fight.” [128]

“Just two days ago she said that her life story was happening faster than her life.” [130]

“I thought, it’s a shame that we have to live, but it’s a tragedy that we get to live only one life, because if I’d had two lives, I would have spent one of them with her.” [133]

“I pointed her index fingers toward each other and slowly, very slowly, moved them in, the closer they got, the more slowly I moved them, and then, as they were about to touch, as they were only a dictionary page from touching, pressing on opposite sides of the word “love,” I stopped them, I stopped them and held them there.  I don’t know what she thought, I don’t know what she understood, or what she wouldn’t allow herself to understand, I turned around and walked away from her, I didn’t look back, I won’t.” [135]

“I can’t live, I’ve tried and I can’t.  If that sounds simple, it’s simple like a mountain is simple.” [135]

“I felt, that night, on that stage, under that skull, incredibly close to everything in the universe, but also extremely alone. I wondered, for the first time, if life was worth all the work it took to live.  What exactly made it worth it?  What’s so horrible about being dead forever, and not feeling anything, and not even dreaming?  What’s so great about feeling and dreaming?” [145]

“So many people enter and leave your life!  Hundreds of thousands of people! You have to keep the door open so they can come in!  But it also means you have to let them go!” [153]

“Then, out of nowhere, a flock of birds flew by the window, extremely fast and incredibly close.  Maybe twenty of them.  Maybe more.  But they also seemed like just one bird, because somehow they all knew exactly what to do.” [168]

“Why would I want to spend eternity next to an empty box?” [169]

“That’s been my problem.  I miss what I already have, and I surround myself with things that are missing.” [174]

“Life.  It was the ultimate secret.” [177]

“When I was a girl, my life was music that was always getting louder.  Everything moved me.  A dog followed a stranger.  That made me feel so much.  A calendar that showed the wrong month.  I cried over it…I spent my life learning to feel less.” [180]

“You cannot protect yourself from sadness without protecting yourself from happiness.” [180]

“He pointed at, Sometimes one simply wants to disappear.
I pointed at, There’s nothing wrong with not understanding yourself.
He pointed at, How sad.
I pointed at, And I wouldn’t say no to something sweet.
He pointed at, Cried and cried and cried.
I pointed at, Don’t cry.
He pointed at, Broken and confused.
I pointed at, Something.
He pointed at, Nothing.
I pointed at, Something.
Nobody pointed at, I love you.”

“That is what death is like. It doesn’t matter what uniforms the soldiers are wearing.  It doesn’t matter how good the weapons are.  I thought if everyone could see what I saw, we would never have war anymore.” [189]

“No matter how much I feel, I’m not going to let it out.  If I have to cry, I’m gonna cry on the inside. If I have to bleed, I’ll bruise.  If my heart starts going crazy, I’m not gonna tell everyone in the world about it.  It doesn’t help anything.  It just makes everyone’s life worse….” “But if you’re burying your feelings deep inside you, you won’t really be you, will you?” [201]

“It’s the tragedy of loving, you can’t love anything more than something you miss.” [208]

“Maybe we’re just missing things we’ve lost, or hoping for what we want to come.” [222]

“Every moment before this one depends on this one.” [232]

“Feeling pain is still better than not feeling, isn’t it?” [245]

“Everything that’s born has to die, which means our lives are like skyscrapers.  The smoke rises at different speeds, but they’re all on fire, and we’re all trapped.” [245]

“She let out a laugh, and then she put her hand over her mouth, like she was angry at herself for forgetting her sadness.” [255]

“And then a thought came into my brain that wasn’t like the other thoughts.  It was closer to me, and louder.  I didn’t know where it came from, or what it meant, or if I loved it or hated it.  It opened up like a fist, or a flower.” [259]

I’m sure I don’t have to tell you that the vast majority of the universe is composed of dark matter.  The fragile balance depends on things we’ll never be able to see, hear, smell, taste, or touch.  Life itself depends on them.  What’s real?  What isn’t real?  Maybe those aren’t the right questions to be asking.  What does life depend on?  I wish I had made things for life to depend on.  What if you never stop inventing?  Maybe you’re not inventing at all.” [305]

“I don’t believe in God, but I believe that things are extremely complicated, and her looking over me was as complicated as anything ever could be.  But it was also incredibly simple.  In my only life, she was my mom, and I was her son.” [324]
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I can’t even begin to explain how moving this book was.  I couldn’t put it down once.  This book made me feel so many wonderful and painful emotions.  Foer executed this book beautifully and accurately.  It’s a breath of fresh air, and a reminder that there are still real people in this world.  This book, at the very least, will pull out emotions from deep inside that you  didn’t know existed; at least that’s what it did for me.  Some books in this world are only great once, but this book I could pick up in 5 or 10 years and still love all the same, and even more.  I loved this book like no other.  It isn’t a book to pick apart and analyze every single sentence or word.  That would simply take away from the realmeaning of it.  It’s a book to think about, and it’s a book you can find parts of yourself in.  With every comment Oskar or any other character made, I found myself remembering how I once or still think the same things as crazy as they may be.  I could go on and on about this book, but for anyone reading this, I highly recommend it.

** UPDATE (4/12)**  A reader recently emailed me asking for my insight on a few of my favorite quotes.  I was on a time crunch, but I managed to scribble down a few things about some of the quotes.  In no way, shape, or form, am I trying to say that I believe that my insight is correct.  It is simply my thoughts and feelings.

“Just because you’re an atheist, that doesn’t mean you wouldn’t love for things to have reasons for why they are.”

—    This was one of my favorites because I question religion far too much.  I’m not an atheist and will probably never have the guts to completely deny something so powerful, but just this quote restated my whole philosophy on life that everything has a purpose and that everything and everyone is here for a reason, not just by a mere coincidence.  Atheists can have vivid imaginations too.

“I shook my tambourine the whole time, because it helped me remember that even though I was going through different neighborhoods, I was still me”

— This is one of my absolute favorites because I actually used to do something like this when I was little (except with me, I had a harmonica….silly, I know).  This is important to the book because it really shows that Oscar creates most of his identity within his house and with those things that he is familiar with.  In his journey to find the lock for his key, he is kind of forced out of his comfort zone into meeting people with new stories for him to hear.  It’s kind of a way for Oscar to mature and to find new aspects of himself in new parts of his city. ( I’m not sure if I look way too much into these quotes, but this is just what I gathered from reading the book like 6 times).

“When Dad was tucking me in that night and we were talking about the book, I asked if he could think of a solution to that problem.  “Which problem?”  “The problem of how relatively insignificant we are.”  He said,  “Well, what would happen if a plane dropped you in the middle of the Sahara Desert and you picked up a single grain of sand with tweezers and moved it one millimeter?”  I said, “I’d probable die of dehydration.”  He said, “I just mean right then, when you moved that single grain of sand.  What would that mean?”  I said, “I dunno, what?”  He said, “think about it.”  I thought about it.  “I guess I would have moved a grain of sand.”  “Which would mean?”  “Which would mean I moved a grain of sand?”  “Which would mean you changed the Sahara.”  “So?” “So? So the Sahara is a vast desert.  And it has existed for million of years.  And you changed it!”  “That’s true!”  I said, sitting up.  “I changed the Sahara!”  “Which means?”  he said.  “What?  Tell me.”  “Well, I’m not talking about moving that one grain of sand one millimeter.”  “Yeah?”  “If you hadn’t done it, human history would have been one way…” “Uh-huh?”  “but you did do it, so…?”  I stood on the bed, pointed my fingers at the fake stars, and screamed:  “I changed the course of human history!”  “That’s right.”  “I changed the universe!”  “You did.”  “I’m God!’  “You’re an atheist.”  “I don’t exist!”  I fell back onto the bed, into his arms, and we cracked up together.”

— For such a long quote, I can really only say one thing about it.  Oscar’s dad is opening up millions of doors of opportunity for Oscar in this quote.  He basically just tells Oscar that it doesn’t take much to change the world.  So many people think you need to be Mother Theresa to say you’ve helped change the world, but it’s not true.  One small act such as moving a grain of sand in the Sahara means you have changed the world, and that is what Oscar’s dad wanted to let him know.

“I felt, that night, on that stage, under that skull, incredibly close to everything in the universe, but also extremely alone. I wondered, for the first time, if life was worth all the work it took to live.  What exactly made it worth it?  What’s so horrible about being dead forever, and not feeling anything, and not even dreaming?  What’s so great about feeling and dreaming?”

For as many times as I have read this book, I still, for the life of me, cannot figure out why Foer titled this story the way he did.  Maybe he just likes the adjectives extremely and incredibly, but whatever the case may be, he uses those words to emphasize something.  I think this is one of those quotes (Foer has about a million of them) that really humanizes the characters in the book.  Foer doesn’t hide the emotions of his characters.  He is very revealing about each and every person’s most intimate thoughts and feelings.  This quote just delves into Oscar’s most inquisitive nature.  Take yourself back to that very first quote in the book with Oscar questioning the mechanics of everyday items and how they work.  Now, after Oscar’s dad’s death, he questions more intense and deep aspects about not only life, but death.

”Feeling pain is still better than not feeling, isn’t it?”

–This is just one of those quotes that is so incredibly true.  We, as humans, underestimate the power of physical feelings because we’re so wrapped up in how we feel mentally.  We want to feel happy all the time…and how ignorant is that?  We overlook how important pain is to life.  It is essential.  We overlook how most physical pain can heal in a timely manner, but mental pain can last a lifetime.  This quote is just to remind us that pain lets us know that we are alive.  It’s not the most comfortable reminder, but it’s a reminder nonetheless.

PS:  I’ve probably gotten at least 15,000 views just on this one post, and as flattered as I am about this, I wouldn’t mind trying to promote my blog for, well, bloggish reasons (i may have just made a new word).  Please, as you stumble up on this or google up on this or however you come across my blog, don’t hesitate to read my regular posts (not like my life really is that readable)…but…it’d be nice to know that someone is patient enough to read through my staggering thoughts.  I guess what I’m trying to say here is I feel like I’m popular for something I didn’t necessarily write.  As much as I love this book and love the quotes I found in this book, they are not my own.  I hope, at least, though, that maybe I inspired at least 1 person to read this lovely book and find as much beauty in it as I did.  So, to conclude, here is the link to my blog with other, more bloggish things:

Girlwithacoin Blog.

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85 Responses to “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (quotes)”

  1. Erin said

    It’s so refreshing to find someone else who truly appreciates the beauty of this book. It changed my life and continues to do so with each read. Enjoy it and pass it on.

  2. Alice said

    I read this book this summer as well.

    It was amazing.

  3. Holly said

    One of my favorite books! This site was helpful, thanks.

  4. zhu said

    i love this novel. it was breathtaking. glad to find someone else feeling the same way. thanks for providing this beautiful piece of nostalgia.

  5. Kira said

    I love the quotes you posted! Thank you so much for putting them up and allowing me to delve into the feelings that this book evokes once again

    Here is one of my favorites for your library:
    We need much bigger pockets, I thought as I lay in bed, counting off the seven minutes that it takes a normal person to fall asleep. We need enormous pockets, pockets big enough for our families, and our friends, and even the people who aren’t on our lists, people we’ve never met but still want to protect. We need pockets for boroughs and for cities, a pocket that could hold the universe.

  6. Denise said

    I loved reading this book.
    I loved how it began. I could not explain it but something drew me to it. And I loved every single word until the very end. Nothing ever moved me more than this.
    No other book ever made me cry reading it on a train, no book ever made me smile that honest.
    I don’t understand how it happened but it changed me and made me so aware of my life, every emotion and every second that passes. Every moment is like music and every tear is adding up a beat to the melody.

  7. Esme said

    This book was amazing and inspiring. I really loved this quote:

    “In bed that night I invented a special drain that would be underneath every pillow in New York, and would connect to the resevior. Whenever people cried themselves to sleep, the tears would all go to the same place, and in the morning the weatherman could report if the water level of the resevior of tears had gone up or down, and you could know if New York was in heavy boots. And if something really terrible happened – like a nuclear bomb, or atleast a biological weapons attack – and extremely loud siren would go off, telling everyone to get to Central Park to put sandbags around the resevior.”

  8. Hannah said

    This book was beautiful, I couldn’t put it down as well.

    There were so many quotes that I bypassed because I didn’t have a highlighter with me! Haha.

    “Shyness is when you turn your head away from something you want. Shame is when you turn your head away from something you do not want.”

  9. Lexie said

    I love this book! I’m bookmarking this page. It’s almost like a handbook to live life by… Thanks for this.

  10. Emilie said

    Eff this book. It sucks. Oskar is a whining, masochistic bitch.

    • girlwithacoin said

      As much as you are entitled to your own opinion of the book, I’m going to have to beg to differ with you. Oscar is a child. Children, by nature, whine. But if this is the only thing you got out of this novel, clearly you did not read deeply enough into it and nor could you grasp the depth and sheer reality of the novel. I am so attached to this novel, that your comment actually offended me.

    • detcader said

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Troll_(Internet)

      If you aren’t posting simply to start an argument, I would say that you’re likely someone with conservative values who can’t appreciate Oskar’s naturalism and uniqueness. Though some of his thoughts were ridiculous and possibly outdated (see: his comments pertaining to environmentalism), he is, after all, a child.

    • Coralene said

      Wow. Somebody needs a hug.

  11. kristyn said

    I think everyone loves this book. How could you not? I knew it was one of my favorite bokos very early on too. I underline quotes in books that I really like… I loved this one
    “It’s a shame,” she said, “that life is precious.” [281]
    Go read Everything Is Illuminated.

  12. Hannah said

    Thank you!!

  13. Katie said

    Thank you for posting all these quotes; I lent the book to a friend and I’ve really missed all the little lines like these.

    Additionally, I thought your take on it was well-put. There’s something intangible about how amazing this book is, how it makes you feel almost every emotion possible, and you feel closer to the world yet farther from it all at once. It was a welcome reminder of what it means to be human.

    I truly believe that there is a bit of each of us in this book, and a bit of this book in each of us.

  14. tricia said

    Thank you for this, really.

    I really do love this book, and it’s true, you get attatched to it. It’s one of those books that you don’t want to put down yet you want to finish it, but once you do put it down, you wish you never had.

    Props to Jonathan Safran Foer.
    I love all of his work.

  15. Megan said

    I read this book for a summer reading project.
    I did’nt think to highly of it until I got farther in.
    It truly moved me and I recommend it. (:

  16. Callan said

    My favorite book ❤

  17. detcader said

    Thanks for these quotes. I’m doing a summer reading project where you have to keep a quote journal, but I read the book before-hand so these quotes helped me.

    I actually figured out, while rereading a part of it: that Oskar only wears white clothes because he heard about how the white chess pieces weren’t destroyed by the nuclear bomb detonated in Japan in WWII referred to in the audio tape he played in class.

  18. sandrar said

    Hi! I was surfing and found your blog post… nice! I love your blog. 🙂 Cheers! Sandra. R.

  19. Carina said

    Thank you for this post. My book is with someone who is very dear to me, but I needed to find the exact quotation tonight. Thank you, again.

  20. marion said

    How lovely that you are are still getting comments on this! I had a copy of this book at my desk, and whenever I needed to, I would just open it to any page and read the page. I’d always find just the right words to give me what I needed. My book is now missing, but finding your post was like finding a garden. Thanks!

  21. Shin said

    Hi! I loved your article. It reminded me why i love this book so much.

    I have actually only read it once, and although i’m usually a very fast reader, it took me ages to finish it because somehow, it stole away my sleep.

    Usually i know how to read in a “detached” manner, but Jonathan Safran Foer managed to chill me to the bone and warm my heart all at the same time.

  22. Claire said

    The best book of all time.

  23. Megan Seastedt said

    Ahh, you reminded me how much I loved this book! I read it while on the road and it was so nice to have a book evoke so many emotions out of me..beautiful!

  24. Alex said

    i honestly can’t describe how much this book means to me.

    you remind me of myself.

  25. Liz said

    i too absolutely loved this book. so poignant and it perfectly expressed so many things that i can completely relate to.

  26. taber said

    I agree with you on almost everything (: I do not agree on how you think picking apart this book and analyzing it would take away from it, though. In my English class, we thoroughly analyzed it and my eyes were opened up to so much more than I had seen myself within Foer’s words. An author cannot always make everything they’re trying to say 100% clear and hearing others perspectives and explanations on parts that didn’t seem relevant to me, really helped me understand more of the book’s meaning 🙂 I’m glad you enjoyed it as well.

    • girlwithacoin said

      thanks! and yes…i wrote this blog a while ago after only reading it once. i’ve ready it 3 times since then and take back what i said about that. i think i only read said that out of spite to the people who were analyzing oscar as a whiny child and not really seeing him for who he really was. thanks for the response, though!!

  27. Elizabeth said

    could you help me with writing responses for extremely loud and incredibly close. I wrote some responses to some quotes and would like your input. by the way your a really great writer.

  28. Elizabeth said

    ok thank you so much

  29. Elizabeth said

    did you get the e-mail?

  30. mari. said

    it was already my favourite book in the first paragraph – what a gem! thanks for the quotes.

  31. April said

    Thank you for writing these quotes. I picked up this book off my sister-in-law’s bookshelf while on vacation and couldn’t put it down. It is really an amazing and wonderful book. Reading the quotes tonight helped me relive some of the moments held within the book.

  32. I always carry a red pen with me when I read books. I underline lines I like. I tried doing the same with this book, but soon found it would be unnecessary to underline every line in the book. I put the pen down and dove into the book. Sans red pen. Just me, Oskar, and his thoughts.

  33. doreese said

    Now I really want to read this book.
    I like your blog. It’s very real. Like mine.

  34. Emily said

    This book is beutiful. I

  35. Emily said

    This book is beautiful. I’ve read SO many books in my life time and i’ve never been this touched. It evokes feeling you didn’t even know you had, all at once. It makes you hopeful but sad and might bring you to tears. It has a good plot with a orignal narrator.

    Thank you for making this page. I’m gonna go re-read this book later now.

  36. lisa said

    this is one of the greatest books ive ever read. it made me feel almost every emotion, even emotions i didnt even know i could feel. just reading these quotes makes me feel how i felt reading the book. thank you

  37. Tiffany said

    I just read this book about a month ago and recently mailed it to a friend. I typed in google “quotes from …” the book, just because I wanted to recall a few of the best parts and my friend has my book, and I was so excited to find this page!! I LOVE this book! It is arguably the best book I have ever read. It’s so ridiculously genius and surprisingly insightful. I was just looking for a good read after I had finished another awesome book and was totally taken aback and caught off guard with the amazingness of this book. My friend who is a few chapters in, called me the other day and we spent an hour just recalling and reciting some of the genius parts that made us laugh and tickled us. And the other parts that were so simply profound that all we could both do, I’m sure, was shake our heads vertically in silent agreement.

    Ahhhhhhhhhh, I loved reading this book. It is masterfully created and I love the pensive and reflective mood it puts me in while not taking away it’s ability to send me into a rolling laughter and say, “What The …” LOL!

  38. Arizona Grey said

    This book shook the foundation of everything I stood on. Never in my life have I read something so powerful. And I’ve read a lot. It changed my life. And got me into college. xD

    • girlwithacoin said

      It really is a wonderful book. Did you write an application essay on it? Because I wish I would have read this book before I wrote all my essays for college. I could have written so much on it.

  39. Keis said

    Wow. Reading this post I felt like…i don’t know…like something’s really missing. Such a wonderful book.

  40. chelsea said

    I recently re-read this book. I did so with a pencil in hand and I underlined every quote I liked or every part that was beautiful. This book is just as incredible and wonderful as it was when I first read it.

  41. jlin2010 said

    I am currently reading this book, after my boyfriend bought it for me. I cannot put it down at all. I’m only about 50 pages into the book, but I am already recommending it to people as “my favorite book in the whole world”. Foer has such a unique way of seeing things and his words are so completely satisfying.
    Just a question- have you read Everything Is Illuminated? Do you have any other great reads to recommend to me?
    Thank you!

    • jlin2010 said

      Hey! I just went through your more recent posts and I’ve gathered that you are a student at LSU? I am going to be a freshman in the fall! I can’t believe it; it’s such a coincidence!

    • girlwithacoin said

      Hey! Yes I have read Everything is Illuminated and loved it as well. If you enjoy Foer, you would probably enjoy Dave Eggers. My favorite by him is A Heartbreaking work of Staggering Genius. It’s just as heartfelt and beautiful and retains the same honesty as EL&IC. Also, you may like The Corrections, Perks of being a Wallflower, Jonathan Livingston Seagull, and anything by Pahliniuk. And crazy that you’ll be going to LSU! If you have any questions, feel free to contact me. I’m no expert, but I can certainly answer questions 🙂

  42. jlin2010 said

    Yeah! It was so weird to find out you go to LSU! I’m really excited – and I only have about a month left!! I’ll definitely let you know if I need anything, thank you! And thanks for you recommendations =)

  43. Deann said

    From the second paragraph, I knew that this was going to become my next favorite book. I teach, and my classes read it over the summer, and most of them loved it to. I’m going to have them look at your blog in class. We also use Iron and Wine’s lyrics from time to time, so i appreciate your title allusion, and I plan to start reading your blog more frequently. Thank you for taking the time to type out these quotes!

  44. demet said

    Such a great book! it made me cry a bunch of times.
    I couldn’t put it down as well, but at the same time I didn’t wanna finish it so quickly. Foer is a genius.

  45. This is definitely my favourite book, I’m so pleased to find so many people so enthused with it!

    Thank you for putting these passages online…I am in the midst of an illustration project in response to this book, so you have been really helpful! Another one of my favourites: ‘Our cups emptied. The day emptied.’

    I am so ready to read it all over again!

  46. […] for a second opinion?  Here’s what some others thought: REAL. | read_warbler | […]

  47. I LOVED this book. Already thinking about reading it again. Thanks for the quotes.

  48. Ap said

    I had never told her how much I loved her.
    She was my sister.
    We slept in the same bed.
    There was never a right time to say it.
    It was always unnecessary.
    The books in my father’s shed were sighing.
    The sheets were rising and falling around me with Anna’s breathing.
    I thought about waking her
    but it was unnecessary.
    There would be other nights.
    And how can you say I love you to someone you love?
    I rolled onto my side and fell asleep next to her.
    Here is the point of everything I have been trying to tell you, Oskar.
    It’s always necessary.
    I love you,
    Grandma

    That one always makes me tear up, it’s at the end I think, where she says “Here is the point of everything I have been trying to tell you, Oskar.
    It’s always necessary”. That part made me feel so soo much, and it still does.

  49. Katie said

    Absolutely one of my favorite books. I’m just rereading it (and simultaneously listening on tape) but I’ve also taught it to 9th grade Honors English classes twice. Teenagers love this book as much as any adult. That is one (of so many) of the things I love about Foer’s world. He nails the different insights that kids and adults have while also showing how pain isolates — but has the potential to unite — us all.

  50. Andreja said

    I am read this book over the summer to do a school project. I didn’t know about this book before, but this was an excellent book. I read more pages a day in this book than I have read in 2.5 days. This book was so motivating! It’s my new favorite book.

  51. J R said

    Thanks for your interpretation of this novel. It’ll help me with my English assignment & oral presentation in class next month. I stood on the rooftop of the world trade centre before they were destroyed. From a distance they were bland looking but up close they were spectacular, intricate & very loud. Inside they were ornate & elaborate. It was terrible watching people die when the towers’ were attacked by terrorists. I believe the themes of this novel are, life and death, happiness & sadness i.e. universal human emotions. Some of the firemen attending to the tragedy came to my country, New Zealand, for a break e.g. some relief & recuperation.

  52. elizabeth said

    THERE IS A MOVING ON THE BOOK, GO SEE THE TRAILER!!

  53. Stephen Meikle said

    cheers cunt

  54. Wayne said

    We read this book in my School 😀

    I loved it

    I can’t wait for the Movie

  55. taylor said

    what is there very first quote from the movie where the little boy is sititng and talking about having graves like sky scrapers below ground

  56. Zachery Bryant said

    This is truly an inspiring book to read. The power, intensity, & knowledge “Oskar” has is absolutely amazing. The motion picture as well is incredible. This book or movie will truly touch your emotions. Be aware if you are going to see this movie bring tissues! I am a huge fan of Sandra Bullock however, she was only in the movie for 24 minutes exactly and I still was truly touched with the scenes she was apart of. “What do you miss most about dad?” “I miss his voice telling me he loves me.” Not only was this Thomas Horn’s first ever star role in a movie but he also put forth more emotion then any 13 year old I have ever seen. If you have the chance, see this movie or read the book. I promise you it will be the best choice you have ever made. I cried like a baby so please be cautious and bring tissues!!

  57. Amanda said

    Foer titled the novel “Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close” because of how close Oskar came to the owner of the key, that one brief moment when he was in the woman’s apartment and heard the man screaming.
    I absolutely loved this novel.

  58. maxv6 said

    I love this book and strongly suggest The Book Thief to anyone who likes Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

  59. loretta said

    I love this book. Thanks for the quotes! they will really help on my project! it is on the rhetoric of choice, and what helps to influence our decisions. How do you make your choices?
    What do you like the best about blogging? What do you like to do?

  60. Sarah said

    I Agree, This Book was Amazing (: But I think You should Have the part where the Main Character (Oskar, right ? I’m Not good with names (x ) Is talking to his dad about the island that floated to Antarctica. I love the paragraph where is dad is talking about everything being frozen, and at the end he says. “And on a frozen shelf, in a frozen closet, is a can with a voice in it.” ❤ Know what I'm talking about? Lol, and I also love the quote "If I have to Bleed, I'll Bruise" From that Book (: KthxBye ❤

  61. Pauly said

    I have a question that i need to answer about how aspects of the author’s life was represented in the text but i am really stuck on it…any help would be great

  62. Julia said

    See, why can’t THIS book be on our required Summer reading list?

  63. Hi there, its nice paragraph about media print, we all know
    media is a wonderful source of information.

  64. Spot on with this write-up, I absolutely believe that this
    web site needs far more attention. I’ll probably be back again to read more, thanks for the information!

  65. Superb post however , I was wondering if you could write a litte more on this topic?
    I’d be very grateful if you could elaborate a little bit further. Appreciate it!

  66. Mickii McKinly said

    I loved this book so much! As for why he titled it the way he did, I know at one point in the beginning/middle of the book, someone says that something(either the bombing or the towers falling or something) was “Extremely loud”, and when Oskar is talking to the guy who met his dad he says they were “incredibly close”(pg 295, I think).

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